Implications for Policy

Slide7

Social Wealth Economy Indicators Change the Conversation for Policies Such As:

  • Paid parental, sick, and family leave.
  • Flexible working hours.
  • Employer support for childcare.
  • Caregiver tax credits.
  • Adequate funding for early childhood care and education.
  • Better pay for child care and long-term care workers.

Modeling Social Wealth in Local Context

Modeling Social Wealth in Local Context

In Monterey County, demonstration projects are underway to integrate indicators of social wealth and economics inventions of caring economic into county policy dialogue. In 2014, the report Social Wealth: Implementing Caring Economics in Monterey County was commissioned by Jane Parker (Supervisor, District 4) and completed by Natalie Cox as part of graduate work at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, in conjunction with the Center for Partnership Studies.

Implementing Caring Economics in Monterey County

Correlations and Implications for Policy

Correlations and Implications for Policy

While individual indicators or clusters of related indicators provide important information on the various dimensions of social wealth, they do not give us an overall sense of how these different indicators interrelate. Nor do they tell us how the accumulation of social wealth matters for human, economic, and societal development.

We explore correlations between different indicators, and explore the strength of the relationship between measures of social wealth and measures of economic growth, productivity, and competitiveness.

For example, we ask whether greater investment in high quality early childhood care and education is associated with fewer behavioral problems such as delinquency, as well as lower child poverty and lower crime rates. We explore other key matters not generally addressed in economic analyses, such as how the status of women correlates with measures of human, economic, and social development.

To illustrate, one measure of the status of women is the gender gap in a particular country, or the gap between men and women along various dimensions of economic, social, and political participation. We present evidence drawn from the Global Gender Gap report (2013) and earlier studies that demonstrates that countries with a smaller gender gap are also countries that are more prosperous, more competitive, and more developed in terms of human capacity. We also present data, drawn from the World Values Survey (2000) that demonstrate a positive correlation between the status of women in a country, and that country’s record in fostering democracy and promoting human rights. In addition, we present the results of studies showing that violence against women imposes substantial economic as well as human costs for a nation.

Social Wealth Economy Indicators:

  • SWEIs for Business
  • SWEIs for Policy Makers
  • SWEIs forAcademics
  • SWEIs for Caregivers
  • SWEIs for Thought Leaders and Advocacy Groups

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